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Purpose for the Creation of AVLDA
AVLDA PMO
AVLDA PMO
The Allah Valley River System
Allah Valley River System

AVLDA PMO
Purpose of the AVLDA

AVLDA was created to address the pressing problems being experienced in the Allah Valley in a cooperative and coherent manner

Its primary function as an alliance is the protection and management of the Allah Valley Landscape through interventions anchored on environmental, economic, social, cultural and organizational development and institution building through an integrated approach


Purpose of AVLDA

AVLDA was created to address the pressing problems being experienced in the Allah Valley in a cooperative and coherent manner

Its primary function as an alliance is the protection and management of the Allah Valley Landscape through interventions anchored on environmental, economic, social, cultural and organizational development and institution building through an integrated approach

Function of the Alliance

  1. The Alliance is a coordinating, policy making, and integrated planning body to respond and address environment problems by undertaking trans-political boundary coherent actions
  2. Respective members develop and implement their own programs/projects/activities thru partnership arrangement in line with the objectives and goals of the alliance to ensure efficiency and impact
  3. The Program Management Office (PMO) plays a secretarial role of the alliance and Board, and it implements policies and plans approved by the Board

Function of the Alliance
  1. Riparian Zone Revegetation Program (RZR)
  2. Rainforestation and Upstream Resource Management
  3. Advocacy/Linkaging/Information, Education and Campaign
  4. Data Resourcing

Riparian Zone Revegetation Program


Rainforestation and Upstream Resource Management


Actions Undertaken by AVLDA

1. Planning, programming and field actions by member LGUs, NGAs & NGOs (forest and upland management, disaster management, river management) in an integrated and partnership approach
2. Institutional strengthening, capacity building, linkage formation and project partnership with private sectors, civic groups and communities
3. Creation of LGU environment and natural resources offices (ENROs) and replication and scaling-up of AVLDA model projects and activities
4.Constant information and education campaign at government and community levels and dialogues with concerned parties on specific issues
5. Landscape mapping using Remote Sensing-Geographic Information System as updated and clear basis for environment, socio-economic and comprehensive land use planning
6. Community-Based Resource Assessment and Mapping for Barangay development and community empowerment
7. Riparian Zone Revegetation (RZR) involving private sectors and civic groups to stabilize riverbanks
7. Riparian Zone Revegetation (RZR) involving private sectors and civic groups to stabilize riverbanks
8. Construction of dikes at critical sections of the rivers and re-channelling of water flow to save prime lands, settlements and infrastructure facilities
9. Rainforestation and Upstream Resource Management (RURM) to improve forest land cover, reduce river siltation and provide livelihood opportunities to upland dwellers
10. Institutionalization of the Riparian Zone and Environment Management at the Municipal and Barangay Development Councils to ensure sustainable project management at the ground and community levels (creation of Municipal/Barangay Environment and Riparian Zone Management Committees-M/BERZMC)

Gaps / Challenges

  • Very high cost of containing the impact of flashfloods
  • Climate Change: occurrence of frequent heavy rains and typhoons
July-2008. Surallah, South Cotabato midstream.
August 1995. T'boli, South Cotabato upstream.
January 2009. Bagumbayan, Sultan Kudarat Downstream.
Lessons Learned

  • Unity among many local leaders in one watershed area is possible
  • Multi-sectoral approach led by the LGUs in environmental management can be institutionalized
  • Addressing watershed disaster problems require long term engagement of stakeholders
  • Local leaders must have strong political will and serious commitment to undertake environmental programs
  • Involvement of private sectors, civic groups and communities is necessary
  • Process of watershed governance creates community empowerment
  • Good technical and management staff to run the daily operation of AVLDA
  • Need to generate updated land cover and other thematic maps as planning tools
  • Need to conduct technical studies and learning visits to enhance programs, plans and policies
  • LGUs should have good Environment and Natural Resources (ENR) programs, relying less from national government
  • Role of academic institutions is very necessary
  • Linkages for citations and awards (Galing Pook) is also essential
Priorities for Future Actions

  • Sustain AVLDA operation through joint LGU ordinance and program complementation
  • Establish pilot sites of RURM among each member LGUs with support from communities, NGOs, civic groups, private sectors, business, academe, women’s group, and national government
  • Increase efforts on education and information campaign even at the community level
  • Increase LGU budget on environmental programs and projects
  • Improve integrated mitigation-adaptation strategies in disaster management in watershed context towards community resiliency like integration of vegetative and infrastructure interventions
  • Increase investments in tree-based economy at the uplands and riparian zone stabilization
  • Strengthen the link of environment and resource-based programs with community livelihood activities and local development such as eco-tourism and waterways development
Priorities for Future Actions

  1. Containment or attenuation of flood waters through flood control check dams in designated outlets of sub-catchments.
  2. River bank protection and stabilization through planting of trees and bamboos at a distance from present active channel based on 25 to 50 year return flood.
  3. Increase runoff retardation by planting fast growing and deep rooted trees in the upland sub-catchments
  4. Conduct of intensive Information-Education-Communication program to all stakeholders, introduction of planning control based on hazard maps, use of flood forecasting and warning, introduction of zoning and control of building codes, and relocation of settlements.


ARCHIVE

MAKING AN IMPACT Eco-Tourism in Allah Valley (Philippines)

AVLDA Celebrates World Water Day

2016 World Bamboo Day

2017 World Bamboo Day



MAPS
AVLDA Administrative Map

AVLDA Administrative and Drainage Map

AVLDA Map of the River Dikes